IADC Young Author Award for 1DH Hopper Loading Model of Jordy Boone

Jordy Boone receives the IADC Young Author Award at the CEDA Dredging Days

OK, one last time we will revisit the CEDA Dredging Days. There was so much to see and experience, that there could be some more posts about them. However, daily life already demands more of my focus and there are fun facts to tell about them also. The conclusion of this series is about a well-deserved IADC award to Jordy Boone. Both, because he did write a terrific article and we will read more about it in the Terra et Aqua journal soon enough.

So, why was his article and presentation so special? Hopper loading is one of the key process components in the production cycle of a trailing suction hopper dredge. And therefore there is a lot of interest in this subject. Countless articles and numerous experiments have been performed on this topic, resulting in a lot of different hopper models. Traditionally a literature review starts with Camp (1936). And there are a lot of models that build on that approach. Camp and the derived models are similar to the Lagrangian approach, where they follow the trajectory of a single particle.

Basics and relations of Camp and derived models

A whole different approach is to follow Euler and fix the frame of reference. The contents of the system has to be modelled as a continuum. Ground breaking work has been done by van Rhee. He modelled the hopper in a 2D environment and based a more comprehensive 1DV model on that. Others have followed up and so does Jordy Boone.

Van Rhee and similar ‘Euler’ models

Other approaches don’t take any physics in their modelling, but consider the hopper as a process block in a control system. At the moment they are only useful for monitoring and controlling an existing system, they don’t have a predictive value, yet.

Control system models

In this overview, we can see, that the 1DH Boone model is part of the Euler family. Normally solving multi-dimensional 2D and 3D Euler problems tend to be slow. Van Rhee already pointed this out and part of his PhD. thesis was the presentation of a more comprehensive 1DV model. Basically a column cross-section through the hopper. Mixture would be deposited on the bed and water flows up and out of the system. Where that model does lack the influence of the density current, Boone literally upended this simplification by using horizontal strata in the hopper. Here, the mixture section can incorporate the horizontal density current conditions. This will give correct mass and momentum equations. Vertical exchange processes are than calculated by closure relations.

Comparison van Rhee and Boone

On top of the cake, Boone also verified his approach in laboratory experiments and prototype measurements. As his manuscript is also well written and accessible, he rightfully received the IADC Young Authors Award. Keep up the good work Jordy, we hope to see more interesting work from you.

Jordy Boone presenting his 1DH model at the CEDA Dredging Days

References

Camp T. R. (1936). ”A study of the rational design of settling tanks.” Sewage Works Journal 8(5), pp, 742-758

Miedema, S.A., Vlasblom, W. (1996). ”Theory of Hopper Sedimentation”. 29th Annual Texas A&M Dredging Seminar, New Orleans: WEDA

Van Rhee, C. (2002). ”On the sedimentation process in a Trailing Suction Hopper Dredger”. PhD thesis, TU Delft, the Netherlands

Braaksma, J., Klaassens, J. B., Babuska R., de Keizer, C.(2007). ”A computationally efficient model for predicting overflow mixture density in a hopper dredger”. Terra et Aqua, 106, pp. 16-25

Spearman, J. (2013) ”TASS Software – User Guide for TASS version 4.0”. HR Wallingford

Jensen, J.H., Saremi, S.(2014). ”Overflow concentration and sedimentation in hoppers” J. Waterw., Port, Coast. Ocean Eng., ASCE, 40

Konijn, B.J. (2016). ”Numerical simulation methods for dense-phase dredging flows”. PhD thesis, Universiteit Twente, the Netherlands

J. Boone, J, de Nijs, M.A.J., (2017) “1DH Modeling of Transport and Sedimentation Inside a Hopper of a Trailing Suction Dredger” CEDA Dredging Days 2017
Note: Not available online yet. Depending on publication by CEDA.

See also

Hopper Loading: What Happens Beneath the Surface

Overview of hopper loading models by Ben Sloof
Nice report with an overview of the various hopper loading models

Dredging Management Disasters in a Fictional World

Map of the dredging project at the city of Loof in the Country of Distan (Credit: CEDA 2017)

Albert Einstein made his greatest breakthroughs in the ‘Theory of Relativity’ in thought experiments. It provided him the opportunity to contemplate the extreme extends of a simple question: ‘What do I see, when I sit on a beam of light?’ How much more new insight does it generate, when a group of 200 experts in the dredging industry comes together to meditate on a thought experiment of a fictional dredging project in an imaginary country? Sure, the cases presented were very familiar, but that enabled the audience to engage in the action immediately.

Discussions at the interactive session at the CEDA Dredging Days (Credit: CEDA 2017)

In this imaginary world, there was a client, a consultant and a contractor. The client wanted a new quay wall which had to be filled with material from the river and entrance. The consultant drew up a plan and the contractor had to execute it. All three started out with good intentions, but during the project, they fell apart and got entangled in an inextricable knot of legal battles. The back fill material was not right, the dredging equipment was not adequate, the situation in the harbour was different and as problems stacked up to unsurmountable heights, several bad management decisions were taken, bringing the project further in dire straits. Apparently, the parties did not consult the CEDA’s Checklist for Successful Dredging Management!
It was up to the audience to recognise the management pitfalls and discuss the associated problems and solutions. Mike van der Vijver was there to moderate the discussions between the participants and the expert panel. The available expert panel from the CEDA Dredging Management Commission1 was able to provide background information or an alternative viewpoint on the case.

Expert panel of the interactive session at the CEDA Dredging Days: Johny Van Acker, André van Hassent, Kathleen de Wit, Charles Wilsoncroft, moderator: Mike van der Vijver. (Credit: CEDA 2017)

Considering the lively discussion, the concept really drew the audience into the thought experiment and the positive reviews proved they remembered the event long after, hopefully bringing their experience into future dredging projects. The positive effect of the Interactive Session, was that this is one of the few occasions where there is a representative selection of the dredging industry. This enabled some parties, that normally never meet each other in a project, to understand what effects of decisions in the beginning will have further down the timeline. Or the other way around: understand how some stupid contractual clauses were written in the contract, although in hindsight those were bad agreements. My personal opinion is, that the parties shouldn’t have agreed to the contract in the first place.
The Interactive Session was initiated by the CEDA Dredging Management Commission to introduce themselves and the concept of the ‘Checklist for Successful Dredging Management’2. This checklist was introduced the previous day and currently available in a paper version. However, the list will never be complete and is intended to grow and adapt as lessons are learned. So, even on this occasion there were some new issues that might be incorporated. In order to capture the discussion, there was an artist present, who made a graphic recording of the session. Most of the arguments in the audience revolved around the practical and legal side of the case, but I think, somewhere some people in the fictional case should have had the wisdom and courage to say: ‘NO!’

Graphic recording of the interactive session at the CEDA Dredging Days (Credit: CEDA 2017)

References

CEDA DMC

CEDA’s Checklist for Successful Dredging Management
Note: The Checklist will be available to CEDA members from this page.
Remember, first you have to sign in to access the full document.

See also

Mike van der Vijver

 

When does your pump suck?

Regular pump inspection

One of the key process indicators for the performance of your dredge pump, is the capability to work with low suction pressure. The parameter involved is called ‘Required Net Positive Suction Head’. Which translates more or less to: ‘the head value at a specific point required to keep the fluid from cavitating.1’ Effectively, this is the extra pressure above the vapour pressure. From the pump inlet to the blade, there still is a pressure drop. And the geometry and the form of the blade influence this pressure drop. The operator will notice this as when the blade wears down, the pressure drop becomes greater and the required suction pressure goes up. Resulting in less performance and less production. Regular inspection of the pump will warn the operator of prospective deterioration.

Test arrangement NPSHr

Normally, the measurement of the NPSHr requires a valve in the suction pipe and a valve in the discharge pipe to control the flow. Every time you want a data point, you have to adjust both valves and iteratively return to the same flow conditions, albeit with a different suction pressure. This usually takes a lot of time and one hour per data point is not uncommon. Klaas Slager presented an alternative method at the CEDA Dredging Days2. His method is more suitable for testing the NPSHr as installed in a dredge. It does not involve the dredge valves and is quicker to execute. It is optimised to check if the NPSHr wanders off nominal and thus will yield an indication on the condition of the pump. If the internal pressure drop increases, there is less differential pressure available in the suction pipe for the dredging process. Less concentration or less capacity, or less in the combination of the two: less production.

NPSHr measurement processing

Instead of varying the flow conditions, he proposes to vary the pump speed. This will influence both flow and suction pressure at the same time. However, by cleverly applying the affinity laws and presenting the operating conditions in a dimensionless scale, the cavition is immediately visible. A quick post processing will reveal any wandering of the NPSHr conditions. As this can be implemented in the PLC and executed during start-up every day, the operator will receive a daily update on the suction condition of his pump and can plan actions accordingly. This will prevent unnecessary delays and downtime.

Worn down suction side of a dredge pump deteriorates NPSHr

This concludes my scheduled series of posts about the CEDA Dredging Days. There was much more to discover. The interactive session was fun. There were a couple of interesting presentations. And I’ve seen some innovations at the exhibition. So, I will write some more reports, although at a more leisurely pace of about once a week. Later on, the other promised topics will be covered3. I’ll keep you posted.

References

  1. NPSH
  2. Presentation Klaas Slager
  3. Discover Dredging: A new personal website for dredging enthusiasts

See also

CEDA Dredging Days