HYDRO 2018 Gdansk: Selecting A Dredge For Your Reservoir Maintenance

Barrage du Ksob, M’Sila, Algeria with a DOP dredge 350

This week, I am here in Gdansk for a presentation on the HYDRO 2018 Conference1 and assist at the Damen booth at the corresponding exhibition. The paper and the presentation are already prepared and I am very excited to do the presentation, but I can’t wait till tomorrow and I like to share the story now, already. So, you, as my favourite audience, will have my personal spoiler after so many teasers have been floating around2,3,4.

General modes of siltation at the usual location in a reservoir

The thing is, dam maintenance and reservoir restoration is something already long on my attention list. Back already in 2008, I wrote a paper on this subject for the CEDA Dredging Days5. Over and over we’ve conveyed the message on various platforms, that dredging might be a viable solution for sedimentation problems in reservoirs. Usually, the solution by dam owners and operators is to flush, sluice or store the sediment. This looks horrible from a dredging perspective, but it is also to the environment. You either smother or starve the downstream river with sediment. As a right minded dredge enthusiast, you see many possibilities to dredge such a project. Immediately we can identify what dredge to use on which location for which purpose.

Selection of applicable dredges for reservoir dredging

If you are very close to the dam and the length of the discharge line allows it, you might even not need a dredge pump. (No wear parts!) It is a so called siphon dredge. But as soon as there is some further transport involved, either distance or uphill, you need a dredge like a cutter suction dredge or a DOP dredge. For even further discharge, you might employ a booster for increased discharge pressure. If the distance becomes very far, you might have to resort to grabs and barges.

Water injection dredging principle and example (this example would be too big for a common reservoir)

As an intermediate solution you might even consider using a water injection dredge. Usually the reservoir is in the mountains and a bottom gradient will be present, enabling the required gravity flow. The actual dredge should have created a silt trap where it can collect the inflowing material from the water injection dredge. Than it can handle the material as usual.

Alternative uses for the dredged sediment a) silt farming as fertile additive b) gravel extraction for concrete

Off course, the dredged sediment belongs to the river and the best thing would be to gradually release the sediment after the dam. But there might be conditions, where it is beneficial to extract the valuable fraction of the sediment and use it for agriculture or as aggregate in the construction industry.

Dredge selection diagram for reservoirs

We noticed, that it is often difficult to convey to dam owners and operators which dredge to select for which job. Sediment is seen as a liability and not as an asset and they rather neglect issues associated with the sediment. So, I made an attempt to have a plain and simple selection diagram. That is the core of my manuscript. But my objective is, that we will see many beautiful dredges contributing to a sustainable and viable operation of hydropower dams and reservoirs.

New DOP dredge family

References

  1. HYDRO 2018: Progress through partnerships, Hydropower and Dams
  2. LinkedIn Teaser, Saskia den Herder
  3. Damen: Spotlight on Hydro Power Dam Maintenance
  4. LinkedIn Teaser, Olivier Marcus
  5. Multi Functional Small Dredging Solution For Maintenance Of Deep Irrigation Reservoirs And Hydro Power Dams, CEDA

See also

The Ancient History of the Cutter Suction Dredge ‘10th of Ramadan’

Cutter Suction Dredge ‘10th of Ramadan’

Last week I was away to Egypt. I have some emotional ties with Egypt. It took me the better part of seven years, to deliver the cutter suction dredge ‘10th of Ramadan’1, to the Suez Canal Authority. This all started from the qualification tender, building it at the Port Side Shipyard in cooperation with DTC, eventually all the way through the guarantee period. At a certain moment, I was so occupied with this dredge, I even prepared a paper model of the vessel in my own spare time.

Presentation of the paper model of ‘10th of Ramadan’

This nerdy pastime served a practical purpose. The specifications of the construction and the requirements for the installed equipment, were very complicated and it helped me to understand the problems in the hull construction before they arose in reality. The environment of the Suez Canal demands some specific requirements concerning tank and space division. Furthermore, the SCA is very aware of the capabilities of the crew and demands corresponding considerations on equipment and systems. To fit this all in the prescribed box, was quite a puzzle. The normal operational environment of the dredge is maintenance on the shallow shelves of the Suez Canal.

Example cross section of the Suez Canal

The maximum box size, that made the design so tricky was determined by a certain lock to access the irrigation system along the Suez Canal. On the west side of the canal, water from the River Nile is diverted to the fertile land over there. Already in ancient Egypt, this was a much treasured area. Joseph gave this area than called Land of Goshen to his family to live there2. Senausert III, Pharaoh of Egypt (1874 B.C.) also saw the potential of this area and used it to established a connection, between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea by linking branches of the Nile to the Bitter Lakes3. Subsequent kings renovated and expanded the canal, that eventually became known as the ‘Canal of the Pharaos’4. Unlike the international importance of the current Suez Canal, the Canal of the Pharaos was mainly used for local transport of produce of the irrigated land and construction stones from quarries on the Red Sea coast to the monuments along the Nile.

Canal of the Pharaos (Credit: Wikipedia)

In fact, the ancient Egyptians might be called the inventors of dredging canals for transportation, preceding the Chinese by about 1000 years5. Parts of the canal are still there. They are now incorporated into the irrigation system, that the Suez Canal Authority has to maintain, next to the big Suez Canal. In a way, I feel honoured, that the dredge that was once only a figment of my imagination and became a reality, will one day keep this ancient piece of Egyptian history alive and preserve it for future generations. Well, that may be a bit presumptuous, but I still feel proud over this dredge and have fond memories of the people from the Suez Canal Authority I have worked with.

OK, I may have pestered my colleagues so much with my stories about Egypt and my little dredge, they even prepared a cover for a book for me to write about it on my work anniversary.

Cover page ‘Mark Winkelman as Egyptian’ (Artwork: Gert Kraaij)

References

  1. ‘10th of Ramadan’, DredgePoint.org
  2. Genesis 45:10
  3. Canal History, Suez Canal Authority
  4. Canal of the Pharaos, Wikipedia
  5. History of Canals in China, Wikipedia

See also

The Origin of Clay, When Dredging Becomes Sticky

Clay forming Fountain Paint Pot, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

This mud pot gave me a revelation on the origin of clay. I was aware, that clay is a completely different mineral than sand. For starters, sand is based on silicon dioxide and clay on some complex aluminium compound. Sand is mechanically worn down rock, usually quartz. But I never got around to understand where clay came from. Here, a small sign at the side of the mud pot revealed a complete different mechanism: chemical alteration of rock by hydrothermal action.

Sign at the Fountain Paint Pot, Yellowstone National Park, USA

Now, it became clear to me, how all the funny properties of clay arise from this generating process. Unlike weathered sand, clay grains are nice symmetric hexagonal crystals. And these crystals grow under changing conditions for temperature, chemistry and pressure. Exactly the environment in these mud pots. The sulphuric acid leaches the chemicals from the rock matrix, in Yellowstone usually Feldspar, the water bubbles to higher levels, transporting and mixing the ions and cooling down along the way. Just like salt crystallises in brine, the clay shakes out like tiny particles, about 2µm. These flakes coalesce into a new sediment: clay1.

Hexagonal sheets of a clay mineral (kaolinite) (SEM image, ×1340 magnification) (Credit: Wikipedia)

The specific mineral of clay, e.g. kaolinite, is a hydrated oxide. And the hydrate allows the charge of these semi-ions to be moved around. As same charges repel and drive themselves apart, the edges and corners of the little crystal will become negatively charged. Now, there are a bunch of discs that have a preference to stick to each other like masonry. Between the discs, there is not much space making the water content low. But, one can add water and the sediment will swell, but there will still be contact between the ends and centres of the disc. Even with this spongy structure, there is still some consistency. It behaves like a plastic substance, you can deform it and it will stay like that.

The plasticity of clay can be measured by rolling the clay in a sausage and measure the water content at which it crumbles. That is a lower limit. An upper limit of plasticity has to be determined by testing the effect of shaking a bowl with clay. Both methods are described2 in ASTM D4318. The difference of water content between the lower plastic limit and the higher liquid limit is the plasticity index. The higher the plasticity index, the more difficult it is to cut this material. It is like cutting warm butter, material is moved around, but you are not severing chunks of the bulk.

Synthesis of clay and the relevant properties for dredging

Whenever you hear dredge people boast about difficulties in dredging, usually it involves clay also. The cutting itself, it is very hard to cut the material out of the sediment. When the chunks come loose, the chunks will stick to the cutter head and the will get completely smeared over and no new material can be cut or sucked up. After that, the clay chunks will tumble down the discharge pipeline. Under certain conditions, the chunks will snowball and form bigger balls. Finally, the clay gets at the reclamation area and will cause problems with the drainage. Remember, fines clog the pores between the grains and prevent the flow of drain water. And clay particles are very fine and they glue the bigger grains together.

Knowing the properties of clay, it is obvious, that normal cutting tools for sand dredging, do not work in a clay environment. Based on the special properties of clay, we once developed a special clay tool for a specific project3. And it worked4. It was fun. And it will be another story.

DOP pumps with special clay cutter head at the ‘Markthallen’ project in Rotterdam

References

  1. Metasomatism, Wikipedia
  2. Standard Test Methods for Liquid Limit, Plastic Limit, and Plasticity Index of Soils, ASTM D4318
  3. DOP150 creates underground car park, DopDredgePumps.com
  4. Prestigieus project Markthal Rotterdam vraagt om innovatieve oplossingen, Autograaf 42-p.8, MvO Groep

See also